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Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack vs Kia Stinger GT

Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack vs Kia Stinger GT

Dodge vs Kia

The Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack and Kia Stinger GT exist for altogether various reasons and take into account totally various crowds. Yet, they both have rear-wheel drive, powerful engines, similar starting prices, four doors, and fairly roomy rear seats. It sounds to us just like the makings of a natural comparison test.

While Kia has pitched the Stinger as an on the spot shot at the BMW 3-series, it doesn’t fit so neatly into the compact luxury sport sedan segment. It’s larger than many of the four-doors therein class, and its character is somewhat but luxurious. If the Stinger were an athlete, it might play rugby instead of golf. While it can’t quite be considered a muscle car—not least of all because it doesn’t offer a V-8—we think it is a motivating foil for America’s leading (and only) muscle sedan, the Charger.

The Matchup

We may miss a V-8 more if the Stinger GT’s twin-turbocharged 3.3-liter V-6 weren’t so solid. It makes 365 pull and 376 lb-ft of torque, and we would say, it feels much more impressive than those numbers propose. The bottom GT model we tested doesn’t bother with extraneous features available on the GT1 and GT2 trims, focusing instead on the quality performance bits like a limited-slip differential and Brembo brakes.

Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack

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The Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack sounds rowdy supported its name alone, which rings true—even if it’s not the full-bore, supercharged SRT Hellcat model. With an enormous normally suctioned 6.4-liter V-8 underhood, the Dodge has the Kia beat on power, making 485 ponies and 475 lb-ft of torque. This instance also came equipped with execution redesigns like versatile dampers, increasingly forceful 20-inch haggles, and Brembo brakes.

Kia Stinger GT

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Just like the Kia, it is also rear-wheel drive (all the higher for smoky burnouts) and routes power through an eight-speed automatic drive. Its enormous muscle advantage is balanced to some degree by its mass since it tips the scales at an astounding 473 pounds heavier than the Kia.

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On the Road

The difference in size between these two cars is that the single biggest think about how they drive. Where the Charger is enormous and brutish, the Stinger is dexterous and deft. The Dodge feels twice as wide on narrow twisty roads, while it’s just one.4 inches wider if truth be told. This makes it somewhat less desirous to change direction than the Stinger, which exhibits sharp turn-in responses and a pleasant sense of balance. But that’s to not say the Charger doesn’t understand how to bounce. It’s enjoyable to drive in its own extraordinary manner, with satisfyingly substantial controlling and a high grasp limit. The Dodge’s additional weight likewise causes it to feel more planted and secured down than the Kia, which comes up short on a proportion of wheel control on bumpier streets that occasionally can make it feel skittish.

At the test track, the stout Dodge shocked us by beating the Stinger in both parallel grasp (0.95 g to Kia’s 0.92 g) and in 70-to-zero-mph slowing down; the Dodge came to a halt in an exceedingly short 150 feet, while the Stinger stopped from 70 mph in 159 feet. Tires are certainly an element here. Both cars were fitted with summer tires, with the Charger shod with aggressive 275-width Pirelli P Zero rubber all around, and also the Stinger sporting a staggered Michelin Pilot Sport 4 setup with 225-width tires within the front and 255s within the rear.

Still on the road…

Subtlety isn’t the Charger’s strong suit. The Hemi V-8 makes a stir everywhere it goes, with a particular roar that turns heads and a loud exhaust that features a way of disturbing the peace. It isn’t all for a show, either, because the Charger bolted from zero to 60 mph in a formidable 3.9 seconds, outmuscling Kia’s still quick 4.4-second go by a half-second. The edge is similar through the quarter-mile, where the Dodge runs 12.3 seconds at 115 mph versus the Stinger’s 12.9-second go at 110 mph.

When you are not at the drag strip, though, the Dodge struggles to place its power down smoothly. Its throttle appears like a toggle, making it hard to roll into the V-8’s generous torque without overdoing it. The Kia’s considerably quieter V-6 might not have the presence or charisma of a V-8, but it responds to throttle inputs more naturally, giving it an energetic feel without being jumpy. The double turbochargers spool up rapidly, and its eight-speed transmission kicks down easily, which means the Stinger picks up speed with more balance and accuracy than the Dodge’s animal power approach. Furthermore, incredibly, the Stinger commanded the Charger inefficiency. The V-6–controlled Kia tasted fuel at a pace of 23 miles for every gallon contrasted with the V-8 Dodge’s 17 mpg.

The Inside View

As ostentatious and attention-grabbing because it is on the surface, especially in our test car’s attractive F8 Green paint, the Charger’s interior is decidedly dour and unimpressive. Our test car was equipped with ordinary-looking cloth upholstery with a houndstooth pattern, and therefore the dashboard materials fall closer to the rental-car end of the spectrum than you’d think. The Stinger is opulent in contrast and comes closer to living up to its pricing with way more modern-looking dashboard design and attention-grabbing red leather upholstery.

Kia Stinger GT

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The Dodge’s lodge feels claustrophobic, despite the fact that the back seats are agreeable due to thickly cushioned pads.

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The Stinger’s rear quarters feel airier and more spacious, although the seat’s bottom cushion is simply too low to be truly comfortable for adults, and there is not much foot room under the front seats. The Charger includes a major trunk for a vehicle, at 17 cubic feet; however, the Stinger’s substantial 23-cubic-foot hatchback beats it sufficiently.

Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack

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Both cars feature easy-to-use infotainment systems. The Dodge’s 8.4-inch touchscreen utilizes Fiat Chrysler’s coherently spread out Uconnect programming and reacts rapidly to pushes from your fingers.

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The Stinger’s smaller 7.0-inch touchscreen isn’t as visually impressive, but it, too, features a menu structure that’s simple to navigate. Higher Stinger trim levels include a bigger touchscreen and a digital instrument cluster, but we didn’t miss those extras much given how well everything works inside the Kia.

The Bottom Line

How you’re feeling about the difference in price between the Dodge and therefore the Kia will depend upon what you’re willing to acquire. The Dodge Charger has the clear draw near terms of outright performance, and it’s exactly as loud, mean, and brash as a V-8–powered American sedan should be—even more so if you choose for the Scat Pack’s new-for-2020 Widebody package that adds fender flares and even fatter tires. If a real muscle car is what you’re after, it is the only choice here.

However, for a few thousand dollars less, the Kia strikes us in light of the better-adjusted decision of the 2, with execution numbers just somewhat behind the Dodge’s and an increasingly premium demeanor and distinctive appearance that produces it want a considerably more special vehicle overall. In spite of the fact that we welcome Dodge’s in-your-face mentality, it is the Stinger’s more nuanced way to deal with sports-car greatness that influences us.

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