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Lamborghini Urus vs Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

Lamborghini Urus vs Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

Lamborghini vs Mercedes-Benz

Lamborghini Urus vs Mercedes-Benz GL-Class: Hello everyone, in this article we are going to discuss and compare the two (Lamborghini Urus vs Mercedes-Benz GL-Class) beautiful as well as luxuries SUVs. Firstly, the Urus which is an SUV manufactured and developed by the famous manufacturer Lamborghini. Secondly, the GL-Class which is a full-size luxury SUV developed and manufactured by Mercedes-Benz since 2006.

So, without wasting any more time, let’s start Lamborghini Urus vs Mercedes-Benz GL-Class.

Lamborghini Urus

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One of the world’s fastest SUVs. The Lamborghini Urus is the thing that happens when the producer of the planet’s most shocking supercars turns its hand to a huge five-entryway family vehicle with legitimate ground leeway and rough terrain capacity. On paper it’s a clash of purposes, in reality, it’s a mouth-watering prospect. Could Lamborghini infuse some genuine supercar DNA into a 2.2-ton SUV that shares its underpinnings with the Audi Q7, Bentley Bentayga, and Porsche Cayenne? Can it justify the high price tag when you can have an SQ7 for the lower price tag? What’s more, would someone be able to disclose to us why it put the back entryway handle where it did?

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It’s been an agonizing six-year wait for the 2012 Urus concept to turn into the production car here, but Lamborghini is a tiny company that doesn’t forget, selling just 3,500 cars a year. Getting this vehicle right could sling Lamborghini into an alternate circle – with more cash to assemble progressively shaggy arsed supercars we know and love. It’s why there’s a tangible feeling, at the launch event in Rome that this car matters, deeply, to every employee. Failure is not an option.

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The Urus shows up riding on the influx of an SUV blast. Bentley has taken off-road luxury to a new level, the Rolls Royce Cullinan is just around the corner, Jeep is busy shoving Hellcat engines into the Grand Cherokee and even Ferrari is exploring its options. But, for now, at least, the Urus stands alone as the world’s first and only true Super SUV. Let’s hope it can live up to the billing.

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Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

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This all-new huge brute of a seven-seat SUV is the top of the line extravagance 4×4 of all in the US. Yes, it even outpoints the Range Rover, plus all the big SUV iron Detroit churns out in such vast numbers. Why have 180,000 been sold since its launch in 2006? Because it’s a Benz, seats seven and, well, is very big. Size matters, it seems.

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So although downsizing is all the rage these days, it’s a concept that’s bypassed the latest GL entirely. At least it’s more elegant than before, with the unusual styling approach is seen on the latest ML appearing a bit more cohesive and, dare we say it, subtle here. Remember this next time one’s bearing down on you.

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Lamborghini Urus vs Mercedes-Benz GL-Class: Driving

Lamborghini Urus

Let’s cut to the chase. Yes, we’re all sad that Lamborghini hasn’t plumbed in either its psychopathic V10 or operatic V12, but we’re told they will live on in the replacements for the Aventador and Huracan, albeit with hybrid assistance. And let’s get some perspective here, a 4.0-liter twin-turbo V8 producing 641bhp and 627lb ft of torque (from just 2,250rpm) is an able substitute. What it lacks in revs (the redline is 6,800rpm), it makes up for in rib-crushing torque, whenever you need it, whatever ratio you find yourself in the eight-speed auto.

Out on the Vallelunga circuit, it’s barely believable the way this high-riding two-tonne family car flings it out of corners, fast and flat. I honestly don’t think it would be too far behind a regular Huracan if you got the stopwatch out. The key, of course, is technology. Mass-masking, physics-battering, driver-flattering technology. Much like the Porsche 911 began its life with an inherent weight imbalance that has been engineered out over the years, the fast SUV is an intrinsically flawed concept in itself – but Lamborghini has thrown everything the VW Group can muster at it to ensure it drives like something its size and shape really shouldn’t.

Three further modes are reserved for off-road shenanigans: Terra, Sabbia, Neve (gravel, sand, and snow). Whether it can rock crawl like a Range Rover remains to be seen, but Lamborghini did lay on a dirt rally stage to prove that the Urus can manage big bumps at speed and adopt some amusing angles while doing it. If you live on a farm, you’re in for a treat.

Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

Bearing down, you say? Surely that would be fanciful, given the sensible-shoes gallons of diesel we’re likely to get here in the UK? Well, you’d think so. But while Britain will get a fine 258bhp 3.0-liter V6 diesel (with smooth-running manners and a huge amount of torque), it will also get a 557bhp GL 63 AMG, that can hit 60 in under five seconds. How’s that for sheer contrast? Frankly terrifying pace for something approaching 3 tons.

Not that it corners with such nostril-flaring intensity. The emphasis here is very much on comfort. Indeed, even with the dynamic skeleton changed to Sport, it stays a major, wafty transport of a vehicle, disengaging you from the street underneath as opposed to squeezing your face into it. Don’t worry, it doesn’t topple over at the sight of a corner, but it hardly attacks them with relish. Enjoy instead the way it brilliantly soaks up bumps and keeps you distant front the worst South London can throw at you.

On the inside

Lamborghini Urus

You might imagine that in the pursuit of sportiness and a low roofline (the Urus is 100mm lower than the Q7 or Bentayga) interior space would be completely compromised, but it’s not, not entirely. Despite that sloping roofline and pumped rear wheel arch space in the back is surprisingly accommodating. We’re talking a six-footer behind a six-footer with a bit of head and elbow room to spare, and a 616-liter (1,596-litres with the rear seats down) boot behind that.

In the front, there’s just the right amount of claustrophobia. Although the view out is marginally compromised by the high window line, you sit low, snuggled inside the belly of the car rather than perched on its shoulders. It’s all a far cry from the day Countach owners had to swing open the door and sit on the sill to reverse.

Surrounding you is a high-tech interior with all the quality marks of an Audi, but skinned to be a Lambo. Everywhere you look there are hexagons, angles, and Alcantara. The principle switchgear, particularly the starter button under a flip spread and the rigging selector, are intended to feel thick and modern, similar to the Anima switch that lets you toggle through your driving modes. It’s the Yorkie bar center console of the car world.

The centerpiece is a three-screen architecture lifted from the Audi A8 – catapulting the Urus to an electronic generation ahead of the Bentayga and Q7. Behind the wheel is the now familiar digital instrument cluster, while in the center console the upper screen takes care of navigation, infotainment, your telephone, and care settings. The lower screen is your interface for climate control, heated seats, and a virtual writing pad if you’d rather scribble your destination in rather than scrolling and clicking.

Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

Need we tell you it’s very, very big inside? For all three rows of passengers too – all of whom will be able to converse easily as it’s also very, very quiet inside. It has standard acoustic front windows, sprayable acoustic materials, and even optimized aero-acoustics

It’s every bit as hushed as an S-Class. It’s every bit as opulent too, thanks to details such as a giant three-part sunroof, rich trims, and materials, Mercedes’ full arsenal of technical hardware and some of the best (and biggest) seats around. Mercedes will also sell you a brace of infotainment gadgets so everyone is kept entertained. Yes, the GL is a surprisingly adept MPV…

Owning

Lamborghini Urus

While there’s genuinely space for the whole family, plus a slightly terrified dog in the boot, running the Urus isn’t going to be Skoda Kodiaq cheap. Lamborghini claims (on account of a smart chamber deactivation framework that stops four chambers underneath 3,000rpm leaving you with 173lb ft of torque to work with) this is its most fuel-efficient car ever. That is relative in light of the fact that 22.2mpg and 290g/km of CO2 are as yet juicier than most things with a number plate. Still, the 85-liter fuel tank means you can realistically expect over 400 miles between fill-ups.

Choices savvy, we’d propose maintaining a strategic distance from the individual back seat choice and staying with the standard seat. That way you can fold the rear seats when you need an expanded boot. The rest is up to you, but bearing in mind this is a high priced car even before you’ve got jiggy with the configurator, be warned that things can get very pricey, very quickly.

And finally, there’s the social aspect. Public opinion on SUVs has softened considerably over the last five years, and they’re no longer perceived as the gas guzzlers they once were, but even so, a Lamborghini SUV is a strong image to project. One not everyone will appreciate it. The Urus’ biggest problem is probably not any direct rivals, but the fact that for the high price tag you could buy yourself a new Range Rover and a Porsche 911 to blat around in at the weekends.

Mercedes-Benz GL-Class

Prices are, you won’t be surprised to discover, on the high side: they start at just so low. The options list can see you spend the price of a decent A-Class with ease. At least it’s greener than before, with the GL 350 CDI doing 35mpg. No wonder all but a handful of Brits will choose it: just the antidote for those who need more seats than a Range Rover can provide.

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